Sunday, December 14, 2014

Yuletide Magic

With 10 days to go before Christmas, I invite you all to revel in the holiday spirit. No, I don't mean the shopping. In fact, I'm suggesting that you try to tune out the calls for shopping and insane consumerism that has given this time of year a bad name.

As winter comes upon us, the need to come together as community, as family, as humanity is stronger than ever. The nights grow long, the days are too short, and the ever-present cold is unnerving. In this season, we need to come together to share what we have, to share the warmth of our hearth-fires, and to protect each other. Because if we don't, the harshness of winter can literally kill us, both in body and in spirit.

Instead of griping about the consumerism and the crassness of the holiday, I invite you to extend your generosity of time and effort to people who need you. Do what you can, when you can.

  • If you see someone in distress, ignore your first impulse to not get involved and go see what you can do to help. No gesture is too small.
  • If you see someone stuck in the snow, go help them out, even if it makes you late for something. 
  • Whenever you can, look people in the eyes, shake their hands, and wish them a happy holiday. And mean it.
  • Donate your time, your talents, and if you can afford it, your funds to charities that support people in need, either locally or abroad.

And if you have the good fortune of being the recipient of someone else's generosity, be gracious, modest, and appreciative. Also, take the time to mark this moment as a happy memory. It will change how you relate to this time of year.

The darkness at this time of year can be deceiving. It fools us into thinking we are alone and that there is no one else out there in the darkness. But the truth is that when you share your light with others, you end up with more light, revealing all the people who are there with you, who have been with you that whole time. It's easy to forget that, but I'm reminding that it's true. You are not alone.

I wish you all a memorable, safe, loving, generous holiday season. All of us are looking forward to your generosity of spirit.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Tragedy in Ottawa 2014

Some people are suggesting that today's tragedies in Ottawa and St. Jean-sur-Richelieu are the fault of immigrants, and I absolutely agree. We need to dump the Harper government, put the First Nations Elders in charge, the rest of us must return to our cultural countries of origin, and then reapply for Canadian citizenship. We have clearly done enough damage to this country.

This is why the "immigrant problem" argument is such a crock. We are a nation of immigrants. Everyone draws the line at themselves and then points at others. "Our family is proudly Ukrainian-Canadian, but it's THOSE immigrants that are the problem!"

Monday, September 29, 2014

Papal Proclamation: Claiming Debate Victory

I'm hereby laying claim to a piece of Internet lore and labeling is thusly:

When you engage in debate with someone and they get so frustrated that they abandon the topic entirely to start making degrading remarks about you and your character, you are to proclaim "Hobbesidan Victory! I have won this debate!"

Now that you've won the debate, you can walk away from it satisfied. After all, it's your opponent who admitted defeat when he changed the subject to indulge in petty personal attacks in an attempt to distract you and possible others from the fact that he was losing the argument anyway.

You crossed the finish line first. Bravo! To celebrate your Hobbesidian Victory, walk away from your computer, have some tea, and relax. You don't need to prove another thing. You are a winner.

So to be clear, here are the rules:

1. You are engaged in a debate on an issue.
2. Keep your contributions to this debate on the issues. As tempting as it is, don't indulge in personal attacks.
3. Once the other party makes a personal attack against you, you are hereby authorized to claim "Hobbesidian Victory!"

Then go outside and enjoy the fresh air. Also, as Professor Elemental laments, we all need to stop feeding the trolls:


Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Cleansing a House of Unwanted Spirits

Over the years, I've had a few people who have had to deal with spirits or haunted place ask me how to deal with it. I myself have lived in haunted apartments, but so far *knock wood* none have been nasty. I prefer to live with the spirits if I can, because after all, they were there first!

If you suspect that your living space is haunted, you have a few options. You could get a paranormal team to come in (most times for free), but all they will do is confirm what you already suspect. They don't usually have the skills to rid a home of spirits.

To deal with this yourself, you have a few of options:

1. Accept that your space has spiritual presence and learn to live with it.

2. Speak to the Spritis: Assuming that the spirits are not actually doing anything harmful to you (aside from creeping you out), you can find a way to live with them in that space. However, you can announce yourself and set boundaries. On a quiet night when you are sure to not be interrupted, put out all the electrical lights and light one or more candles instead. Sit quietly for a few minutes and then in a quiet but firm voice, introduce yourself, tell them your story (as you would meeting a new person), and state your rules for living with these spirits in harmony. Then sit quietly for as long as you feel is necessary (at least a few minutes). Afterwards, you should take notes on anything that happens.

3. Cleanse the House: If the spirits are not respecting your boundaries, or you have decided you cannot live with them, you can push them out. For this to happen, you can do this on your own, but it would be better to involve your children and any of your friends who are open to it (4 or 5 people should do). Try not to bring in raging skeptics because their self-doubt will weaken what you are trying to do.

You will need the following materials:
  • sage (or an incense that you like)
  • one candle per person (something you can hold comfortably in your hand)
  • one or two small stones per person
  • two mantras that you must write and everyone must learn (you might want to print up a copy for each person).

a. On a quiet evening, put out all the electrical lights, gather your people outside the space, and give them the material and the instructions of what you are about to do. Light the sage and let it smolder (you should disconnect the fire alarms in the house). Each person should light their candle and either hold the two small stones or place them in their pocket.

b. Holding their candle and sage, have each person walk through the house tracing the walls of each room (give about 2 minutes between each person), and pointing the sage at the wall. Each person needs to imagine that the sage is burning away any negative energy in the space, leaving it neutral and empty.

c. As each person walks the house, they read the first mantra. The exact words are not important, but the intention behind them must be clear. The words can be something like this:
"In the name of my friend [insert name here], I cast out all negative energy from this place. I cast out all spirits or any other entities from this space. This is a place that is quiet, neutral, and safe."

d. Repeat this mantra for every room and hallway as they walk through it, burning the sage. Focus on this task and try not to be distracted by anything or anyone else.

e. Once everyone goes through, the person or people living in the space should go last.

f. Put out the sage and put it aside.

g. Holding their candle, have each person walk through the house allow the candlelight to fill each space, tracing the walls of each room (give about 2 minutes between each person). Each person needs to imagine that the light is filling the space with good feelings, love, and positive energy.

h. As each person walks the house, they read the second mantra. The words can be something like this:
"In the name of my friend [insert name here], I declare this place to be filled with love, friendship, and good times. I look forward to many good times and great memories to fill this space. This is a place that is loving, filled with friendship, and safe." You can also talk about all the good times and good memories you are looking forward to having in this place.
i. Repeat this mantra for every room and hallway as they walk through it. Focus on this task and try not to be distracted by anything or anyone else. As each person walks through the space, have them place their stones in random spots through-out the house (don't leave them on the floor where they can be stepped on).

j. Once everyone goes through, the person or people living in the space should go last, completing the process.

Once this process is completed, have a party as soon as possible and let your friends fill the space with happiness.

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Reasonable Rates for Pagan Services

Here are the results from the Reasonable Rates for Pagan Services survey! 58 people responded (one person entered all 9s in all the fields which I marked with a Red N/A).

You can select the question and see the results using the Tabs at the bottom of the page. I reworked the layout a bit so that it would be more readable, but the results are accurate.

http://mprc-crpm.ca/SurveySummary_06172014.htm

Friday, May 30, 2014

Pagan Festival Firepit Etiquette


Note: this is an article in a series about Pagan Festival Etiquette. See the label fest etiquette for other articles.

--
One of the main attractions at pagan festivals is the firepit. As with the ancient people, the presence of a communal fire naturally draws people together, creating instant community (just add wood!). What happens around these firepits greatly depends upon the people, the program, and the weather.

What you can expect around a firepit is as follows:
* conversation and socializing
* bardic performances (singing, dancing, poetry, storytelling, etc.)
* dancing
* drumming
* ritual
* discussion
* all of the above
* none of the above

The firepit should be a safe place where everyone is welcome to share in the fire's heat and light. This shared experience creates a bond, but it is everyone's responsibility to maintain it. The firepit is a magical place where friendships are forged, beauty is celebrated, stories are shared, and where laughter reigns supreme.

But a firepit is also a surprisingly delicate environment. It can be easily destroyed by ego, rudeness, carelessness, or even physical danger.

Navigating the Firepit
==================

If you know where the firepit is going to be during a festival, take a moment during the daytime to visit it and get a feel for where everything is. When it's dark out and your night vision is shot due to the bright flames, that's not a great time to try to figure out where the bathroom is.

Take note of where the entrances and exits are, how big the area is, and chat with a staff person about what generally happens at the firepit at night.

Also, NEVER walk into a seemingly unlit firepit, day or night. If there was a bonfire the night before, it's very likely that there are burning hot coals right beneath the two inches of seemingly cool ash. It's a kind of hot-foot that's going to stay with you for a good long time.

What to Bring
============

Because night-time temperatures can be a bit tricky, it's best to dress in layers. Right next to the firepit might be toasty warm, but just a few feet away can be quite chilly. You should have layers that allow you to sit, stand, and cuddle up to the flames comfortably.

You should bring a camp chair so that you can take a load off and rest occasionally. It's always more comfortable than the cold, hard ground. It also gives you a place to store your things when you're off wandering, dancing, or socializing.

Make sure your camp chair is not in anyone's way and won't be tripped over accidentally. If people are dancing or mingling around the firepit, don't put your camp chair in their path. A good rule of thumb is to see where the fire-keeper is sitting and put your chair about the same distance away from the firepit.

You should also avoid bringing any valuables to the firepit. We all want to believe that everyone is good and honest, but with a just a little inebriation, people can walk off with your things either on purpose or by accident. Don't bring anything that you cannot stand to lose (wallet, car keys, jewelry, electronics, money, etc.).

If you find anything that seems to be lost, you should bring it to the Registration office or ask a security/staff person about dropping it in the Lost/Found box. Karma: it helps everybody.

Fire-keepers
==============
Most firepits have a fire-keeper, which is a person in charge of keeping the fire bright, strong, and hot. Fire-keepers also maintain a level of security around the fire to keep the people safe. In recent years, some fire-keepers have also taken on the task of keeping the fire dancers hydrated by having drinking water on hand.

Fire-keeping is more than just tossing the odd log onto a blaze. There is skilled technique at work, there is strategy, and there is a living relationship being forged between the fire and the fire-keeper. The fire-keeper creates the fire, tends to it lovingly for hours, and extinguishes it when the celebration ends (sometimes as the sun is rising!). Some might even see fire-keeping as a sacred ritual being performed with the fire and fire-keeper as the only participants.

The bonfire is a sacred place, so unless the fire-keeper says otherwise, only the fire-keeper is allowed to feed a fire. Just as you would not give candy to a child you did not know (or whose parents you did not know), you should not poke, prod, or throw anything into a fire without the fire-keeper's permission. The sacred fire is not a place for your garbage, no matter how pretty its fiery consumption might be. Aside from upsetting the delicate balance that the fire-keeper is trying to maintain, it can also create sudden sparks and floating embers that burn, scald, or set others alight.

If a fire-keeper asks you for help, be honored by the request and do your best to help. Don't be afraid to thank the fire-keepers for their quiet, yet essential role in the evening's festivities. Enjoy the firelight, enjoy the fire's heat, and respect the fire-keeper's responsibility in creating that sacred, magical space.

The fire-keeper usually has a path cleared between the firepit and the stack of firewood. Make sure you don't put anything to block that path, including yourself. 

Smoking
============

As the popularity and the population around a firepit increases, so do the complications of bringing lit cigarettes into a crowded space. Aside from the complications of second-hand smoke and allergies, having a tiny lit fire stick around too much exposed flesh can result in burnt skin or worse.

Smokers are invited to step away from the firepit area to enjoy their cigarettes in peace, surrounded by like-minded people. Please do not throw your cigarette butts in the sand (see the paragraph on burnt skin) and do not throw them into the sacred fire. Butt cans are usually provided to extinguish and contain your expired smokes. If there are no butt cans, then bring a Yuck bottle (a bottle with water/sand inside to hold your butts) or request some from the Fest staff.

If you decide to use non-tobacco based products, please take them far away from the firepits and consume them in private.

Proximity to the Firepit
==========================

When standing around a firepit, keep in  mind that everyone wants to feel the heat and watch the flames, so as much as possible, try not to stand in front of anyone and denying them access. Sometimes this can be unavoidable, but do your best to be accommodating.

Also, don’t get too close! Skin burns are painful for a long time, so keep exposed skin a safe distance from the flames. If you are wearing flowing clothing, be hyper-aware of how the extremities of this clothing is moving in relation to the flames. Lit clothing is not only a danger to yourself, but to anyone standing around you.

Try to stay out of the way of the people tending the fire (the Fire-keepers). Not only are they trying to maintain the fire, but they also need to keep it from burning out of control. Try not to get between them and the places they need to be.

If people want to dance around the fire, give them some room to move. This might mean you have to stand farther away from the fire than you’d like, but try to be accommodating. Don’t stand so close to the firepit that it puts the dancers at risk of stumbling or falling in. We all need to do our part to keep everyone safe.

Sharing a Firepit
=====================

What people do around a firepit depends greatly on the event, the time, and the location of said firepit. Some firepits are largely social gatherings where people sit or stand in groups and catch up on news, tell jokes, and just enjoy each other's company.


Try to keep the volume of your conversation to a respectful level so as not to drown out other people. You should NEVER use a video/audio recorder to record what is said around a firepit without *everyone’s* explicit permission.

The attention of the crowd might shift from intimate conversation to a group discussion, but this should be as organic as possible. In most cases, insisting that everyone stops talking to listen to you speak is regarded as rude.

If a Firepit is being built to allow people to dance, there are usually a few key elements: a ring of dancers, the muscians (drummer) in one corner, and the watchers on the outside. No one is obliged to dance, but the dancing line is open to all. Generally, the dancers will move either clock-wise or counter clock-wise, so you are expected to move with the flow of the group. When there are too many people for a single ring, multiple rings will form.

Sometimes people will take some or all of their clothes off while dancing around a fire. Whether this is allowed or not depends on the Festival Organizer, so consult with the Fire-keeper or Security to find out if this is appropriate. 

However, Firepit Nudity is not an invitation to anyone to touch, grope, or make lewd or derogatory comments. You can read more about Clothing Optional Etiquette here.

Potion Bottles
==================
As with many outdoor pagan gatherings (such as festivals), there may be a wee bit of alcohol making the rounds. Pagans tend to be quite generous in sharing their grog, but you should always wait for the offer rather than raiding someone else's cooler. Also, make sure you know and trust the person who is offering you a drink before you imbibe, just to be on the safe side. As the Sufis say: "Trust in Allah, but tie your camel."

Because many people walk in their bare feet around a firepit, especially when it is covered in sand, you should NEVER bring glass bottles to a firepit. No matter how careful you think you're being, it's very easy for a glass bottle to shatter and sow its sharp seeds into the sand, and more importantly, into people's feet.

Discarded glass bottles are also a danger because it's easy to trip on them or even shatter them with your feet. Leave your glass bottles at your campsite and out of foot-traffic's way.

Transfer your festive potions (alcoholic or otherwise) into a plastic or metal container (like a water bottle or travel mug) before you approach the firepit. You may want to identify your potion bottle in someway to distinguish it from all the others (after a few potions, everything starts to blur together).

It's also a good idea to bring a water bottle filled with plain, refreshing water. Dancing around a hot firepit can dehydrate you in a hurry, especially if you are being constantly libated with mystery alcoholic drinks. Pacing yourself with water ensures a safe evening and a (relatively) pain-free morning after.


Firepit Romance
===================
Pagans are an affectionate crowd, but sometimes the firelight can raise more than just the body temperature.  Please keep in mind that the firepit is a social gathering where everyone is enjoying the same space in friendship and community. If you are connecting with a new found love, or rekindling an established flame (pun intended), please take your public displays of affection away from the firelight and to someplace more private.

No one is saying that you can't be affectionate with a friend, but not only does overt sexual expression shut everyone else out, it's distracting, uncomfortable to watch, and even harder to ignore.

Once you make that connection with someone, go for a walk and enjoy their company without the prying eyes, allowing the rest of the people to enjoy the fire rather than your fiery passion.

Monday, May 26, 2014

Preserving Quebecois Culture

So some of you may remember a graphic I posted last week on Facebook that mashed the OQLF and the new Google Word Lens Translator app. If you didn't see it, here it is on Facebook:

It generated some buzz and discussion, which was mostly positive and constructive. I was also called a bigot, told to "f off", and got unfriended by a couple of people. That's fair, I suppose. I don't enjoy being called a bigot, but if you don't like my politics or my sense of humor, then by all means, remove me from your feed. It's your Facebook experience, so do what you have to do.

For the record though, I must state that I do believe that the French culture in Quebec deserves to be preserved, nurtured, and allowed to thrive and evolve. I just don't think that the OQLF is the way to do it. If you want to preserve the art of dance, you can't just force everyone to learn the Charleston and expect dance to thrive. While some people will want to explore what other dance is out there, many people will resent the art of dance being forced upon them. What you want to do is invest in the dance community, allow it to evolve and develop, consume the art that is generated, and make it accessible to as many people as possible.

If it's important to you that Quebec culture should be preserved and allowed to thrive, you either need to personally invest in art and culture that reflects Quebec's cultural identity, past, present, and future, or you pressure government to fund it. Either way, this will allow Quebec art and culture to thrive in a way that can make it easier for the greater population to discover and learn from it.

If you truly believe that preserving Quebec culture is important, prove it by honestly answering at least two of these questions, ordered according to intensity (without looking them up on Google):

1. Name 3 to 5 French Quebecois artists (any genre) whose art you have consumed (purchased) in the last year.

2. Name 3 to 5 French Quebecois artists (any genre) who you know has released their art to the public in the last year.

3. Name 3 to 5 French Quebecois artists (any genre) whose art you have consumed (purchased) regularly in the past 5 years.

4. Name 5 Quebecois artists (any culture, any genre) whose art you have consumed (purchased) in the last year.

5. Name 5 Quebecois artists (any culture, any genre) who you know has released their art to the public in the last year.

6. Name 10 Quebecois artists (any culture, any genre) whose art you have consumed (purchased) regularly in the past 5 years.

How did you do? If were able to answer these questions truthfully and easily, then the artistic cultural community in Quebec thanks you for your support. They would not be able to do what they do without you, and you are actively nurturing Quebec's cultural identity.

But if you profess to value Quebec culture and art and yet you struggled with these questions, then I would suggest that you may not be really valuing Quebec culture in a way that is constructive and supportive. Culture and Art need to be supported and nurtured actively, not abstractly. You should be consuming it substantially and in a way that invests and supports the artists that produce it, which in turn, sustains Quebec's cultural identity.

Until you can honestly make this statement, you are not supporting your words with action. If there is any threat to the preservation of Quebecois culture, you may be actively contributing to its threat and demise.

In addition to personal support and investment, the Quebecois government should be doing more to support the community and contribute to its evolution and development. With government support, the arts and culture can then be made accessible to the general population, who in turn, consume it and support the artists, which allows the Quebec culture to survive and thrive.

Rather than having a narrow definition of culture being forced upon the populace, you can widen access to the culture that is already thriving and allow it to be celebrated.

SIDE NOTE: A few years ago, I was on a Facebook group for people who felt that Anglo language and culture was under attack in Quebec. When I asked these people these same questions but for Quebec Anglo artists, none of them could honestly name anyone local that they supported. I left the group soon after. Supporting our cultural and artistic pioneers is a problem for both Solitudes.

Monday, May 12, 2014

The Trouble with Talking It Out

One of the problems with depression is that it's very difficult to explain how you're feeling when it's happening. It's just a heavy sadness that pervades your entire thought process and it's not caused by any specific issue.

But because we are cause-effect creatures, we *think* it's born of a specific issue and it makes existing issues seem much worse than they are. Also, depression LIES, but it's hard to see that when you're in the middle of it.

Everyone says you need to "talk it out", but it's very difficult to put what is roiling about in your depressed head into words that make any kind of sense. Any attempt at analyzing it results in more paranoia, and any attempt at explaining it to others runs the risk of being misunderstood, creating an even bigger problem.

I just want to disappear into myself, but unfortunately, I'm surrounded by empaths who get negatively impacted by my own misery. It's a rotten thing for everyone and I'm so, so sorry.